Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105577
Title:
Push and Pull in "The Attention Economy"
Author:
Breitenstein, Mikel
Editors:
Lussky, Joan
Citation:
Push and Pull in "The Attention Economy" 2007,
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105577
Submitted date:
2007-10-25
Abstract:
Pull technologies expect users to go to the source, often a static source such as a library catalog, to get the information they need. Push technologies deliver to users some individualized information, usually, that the user might want. Marketers and information-delivery services â the user may or may not have chosen to enroll -- have profiles that target some users to match with some information. The Attention Economy, a model that occurred about the same time as Push/Pull models, holds that attention to quickly shifting forces in affluent society is a commodity that is really more powerful than information control. User-generated information competes with standard sources and makes information-creators out of information-users in new ways. A number of questions are vital in the dilemma of how traditional library goals and resources, and the work of library professionals, can be merged with ad hoc and user-based information and new delivery structures and technologies.
Type:
Conference Paper
Language:
en
Keywords:
Sociology
Local subject classification:
attention economy; user-based information; social issues

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBreitenstein, Mikelen_US
dc.contributor.editorLussky, Joanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-25T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:27:38Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-10-25en_US
dc.identifier.citationPush and Pull in "The Attention Economy" 2007,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105577-
dc.description.abstractPull technologies expect users to go to the source, often a static source such as a library catalog, to get the information they need. Push technologies deliver to users some individualized information, usually, that the user might want. Marketers and information-delivery services â the user may or may not have chosen to enroll -- have profiles that target some users to match with some information. The Attention Economy, a model that occurred about the same time as Push/Pull models, holds that attention to quickly shifting forces in affluent society is a commodity that is really more powerful than information control. User-generated information competes with standard sources and makes information-creators out of information-users in new ways. A number of questions are vital in the dilemma of how traditional library goals and resources, and the work of library professionals, can be merged with ad hoc and user-based information and new delivery structures and technologies.en_US
dc.format.mimetypedocen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
dc.subject.otherattention economyen_US
dc.subject.otheruser-based informationen_US
dc.subject.othersocial issuesen_US
dc.titlePush and Pull in "The Attention Economy"en_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
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