Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105562
Title:
The Epistemic Costs and Benefits of Collaboration
Author:
Fallis, Don
Editors:
Tollefsen, Deborah; Henderson, David
Citation:
The Epistemic Costs and Benefits of Collaboration 2006, 44(S) Southern Journal of Philosophy
Publisher:
University of Memphis
Journal:
Southern Journal of Philosophy
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105562
Submitted date:
2007-03-03
Abstract:
In "How to Collaborate," Paul Thagard tries to explain why there is so much collaboration in science, and so little collaboration in philosophy, by giving an epistemic cost-benefit analysis. In this paper, I argue that an adequate explanation requires a more fully developed epistemic value theory than Thagard utilizes. In addition, I offer an alternative to Thagard's explanation of the lack of collaboration in philosophy. He appeals to its lack of a tradition of collaboration and to the a priori nature of much philosophical research. I claim that philosophers rarely collaborate simply because they can usually get the benefits without paying the costs of actually collaborating.
Type:
Journal Article (On-line/Unpaginated)
Language:
en
Keywords:
Philosophy; Epistemology; Social Epistemology
Local subject classification:
collaboration; epistemic value theory; social epistemology; procedural knowledge; scientific research; philosophical research; mathematical research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFallis, Donen_US
dc.contributor.editorTollefsen, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.editorHenderson, Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-03T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:27:28Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-03-03en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Epistemic Costs and Benefits of Collaboration 2006, 44(S) Southern Journal of Philosophyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105562-
dc.description.abstractIn "How to Collaborate," Paul Thagard tries to explain why there is so much collaboration in science, and so little collaboration in philosophy, by giving an epistemic cost-benefit analysis. In this paper, I argue that an adequate explanation requires a more fully developed epistemic value theory than Thagard utilizes. In addition, I offer an alternative to Thagard's explanation of the lack of collaboration in philosophy. He appeals to its lack of a tradition of collaboration and to the a priori nature of much philosophical research. I claim that philosophers rarely collaborate simply because they can usually get the benefits without paying the costs of actually collaborating.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Memphisen_US
dc.subjectPhilosophyen_US
dc.subjectEpistemologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial Epistemologyen_US
dc.subject.othercollaborationen_US
dc.subject.otherepistemic value theoryen_US
dc.subject.othersocial epistemologyen_US
dc.subject.otherprocedural knowledgeen_US
dc.subject.otherscientific researchen_US
dc.subject.otherphilosophical researchen_US
dc.subject.othermathematical researchen_US
dc.titleThe Epistemic Costs and Benefits of Collaborationen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (On-line/Unpaginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalSouthern Journal of Philosophyen_US
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