Indicators of Accuracy of Consumer Health Information on the Internet

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105437
Title:
Indicators of Accuracy of Consumer Health Information on the Internet
Author:
Fallis, Don; Fricke, Martin
Editors:
Miller, Randolph
Citation:
Indicators of Accuracy of Consumer Health Information on the Internet 2002, 9(1):73-79 Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Publisher:
American Medical Informatics Association
Journal:
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Issue Date:
2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105437
Submitted date:
2004-07-26
Abstract:
Objectives: To identify indicators of accuracy for consumer health information on the Internet. The results will help lay people distinguish accurate from inaccurate health information on the Internet. Design: Several popular search engines (Yahoo, AltaVista, and Google) were used to find Web pages on the treatment of fever in children. The accuracy and completeness of these Web pages was determined by comparing their content with that of an instrument developed from authoritative sources on treating fever in children. The presence on these Web pages of a number of proposed indicators of accuracy, taken from published guidelines for evaluating the quality of health information on the Internet, was noted. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation between the accuracy of Web pages on treating fever in children and the presence of proposed indicators of accuracy on these pages. Likelihood ratios for the presence (and absence) of these proposed indicators. Results: One hundred Web pages were identified and characterized as "more accurate" or "less accurate." Three indicators correlated with accuracy: displaying the HONcode logo, having an organization domain, and displaying a copyright. Many proposed indicators taken from published guidelines did not correlate with accuracy (e.g., the author being identified and the author having medical credentials) or inaccuracy (e.g., lack of currency and advertising). Conclusions: This method provides a systematic way of identifying indicators that are correlated with the accuracy (or inaccuracy) of health information on the Internet. Three such indicators have been identified in this study. Identifying such indicators and informing the providers and consumers of health information about them would be valuable for public health care.
Type:
Journal Article (Paginated)
Language:
en
Keywords:
Internet; Social Epistemology
Local subject classification:
internet; accuracy; social epistemology; health information

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFallis, Donen_US
dc.contributor.authorFricke, Martinen_US
dc.contributor.editorMiller, Randolphen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-07-26T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:25:26Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.date.submitted2004-07-26en_US
dc.identifier.citationIndicators of Accuracy of Consumer Health Information on the Internet 2002, 9(1):73-79 Journal of the American Medical Informatics Associationen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105437-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To identify indicators of accuracy for consumer health information on the Internet. The results will help lay people distinguish accurate from inaccurate health information on the Internet. Design: Several popular search engines (Yahoo, AltaVista, and Google) were used to find Web pages on the treatment of fever in children. The accuracy and completeness of these Web pages was determined by comparing their content with that of an instrument developed from authoritative sources on treating fever in children. The presence on these Web pages of a number of proposed indicators of accuracy, taken from published guidelines for evaluating the quality of health information on the Internet, was noted. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation between the accuracy of Web pages on treating fever in children and the presence of proposed indicators of accuracy on these pages. Likelihood ratios for the presence (and absence) of these proposed indicators. Results: One hundred Web pages were identified and characterized as "more accurate" or "less accurate." Three indicators correlated with accuracy: displaying the HONcode logo, having an organization domain, and displaying a copyright. Many proposed indicators taken from published guidelines did not correlate with accuracy (e.g., the author being identified and the author having medical credentials) or inaccuracy (e.g., lack of currency and advertising). Conclusions: This method provides a systematic way of identifying indicators that are correlated with the accuracy (or inaccuracy) of health information on the Internet. Three such indicators have been identified in this study. Identifying such indicators and informing the providers and consumers of health information about them would be valuable for public health care.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Informatics Associationen_US
dc.subjectInterneten_US
dc.subjectSocial Epistemologyen_US
dc.subject.otherinterneten_US
dc.subject.otheraccuracyen_US
dc.subject.othersocial epistemologyen_US
dc.subject.otherhealth informationen_US
dc.titleIndicators of Accuracy of Consumer Health Information on the Interneten_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the American Medical Informatics Associationen_US
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