Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105383
Title:
Recognizing a Change in World Science System
Author:
Leydesdorff, Loet; Zhou, Ping; So, Min-ho; Park, Han
Citation:
Recognizing a Change in World Science System 2006, 35(2):69-86 The Journal of Yeungnam Regional Development
Journal:
The Journal of Yeungnam Regional Development
Issue Date:
2006
Description:
The Journal of Yeungnam Regional Development 35(2) (2006), 69-86
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105383
Submitted date:
2006-12-30
Abstract:
English Abstract: Kingâ s (2004) â The scientific impact of nationsâ published in the Nature has provided the data for the comparison among nation-states in terms of their research performance with reference to their previous stages. This paper makes an attempt to do a new evaluation of the data from another perspective, which leads to completely different and hitherto overlooked conclusions. This paper found that there were newly emerging nations. While their national science systems grow endogenously, their publications and citation rates keep pace with the growth pattern. The center of gravity of the world system of science may be changing accordingly. Its axis is moving from North America first to Europe, but then increasingly to Asia. At the global level the rise of China and South Korea are perhaps the main effect because of the volumes.
Type:
Journal Article (Paginated)
Language:
en
Keywords:
Science Technology Studies
Local subject classification:
World science system; SCI; China; Korea

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLeydesdorff, Loeten_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Pingen_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, Min-hoen_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Hanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-30T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:24:38Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-12-30en_US
dc.identifier.citationRecognizing a Change in World Science System 2006, 35(2):69-86 The Journal of Yeungnam Regional Developmenten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105383-
dc.descriptionThe Journal of Yeungnam Regional Development 35(2) (2006), 69-86en_US
dc.description.abstractEnglish Abstract: Kingâ s (2004) â The scientific impact of nationsâ published in the Nature has provided the data for the comparison among nation-states in terms of their research performance with reference to their previous stages. This paper makes an attempt to do a new evaluation of the data from another perspective, which leads to completely different and hitherto overlooked conclusions. This paper found that there were newly emerging nations. While their national science systems grow endogenously, their publications and citation rates keep pace with the growth pattern. The center of gravity of the world system of science may be changing accordingly. Its axis is moving from North America first to Europe, but then increasingly to Asia. At the global level the rise of China and South Korea are perhaps the main effect because of the volumes.en_US
dc.format.mimetypehtmen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectScience Technology Studiesen_US
dc.subject.otherWorld science systemen_US
dc.subject.otherSCIen_US
dc.subject.otherChinaen_US
dc.subject.otherKoreaen_US
dc.titleRecognizing a Change in World Science Systemen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Yeungnam Regional Developmenten_US
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