What Public Information Should Government Agencies Publish? A Comparison of Controversial Web-Based Government Information

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105318
Title:
What Public Information Should Government Agencies Publish? A Comparison of Controversial Web-Based Government Information
Author:
Eschenfelder, Kristin R.; Miller, Clark A.
Citation:
What Public Information Should Government Agencies Publish? A Comparison of Controversial Web-Based Government Information 2006,
Issue Date:
2006
Description:
To appear in Government Information Quarterly sometime in 2006 or early 2007.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105318
Submitted date:
2006-01-11
Abstract:
This paper develops a framework to assess the public information provided on program level government agency Websites. The framework incorporates three views of government information obligations stemming from different assumptions about citizen roles in a democracy: the private citizen view, the attentive citizen view, and the deliberative citizen view. The framework is employed to assess state Websites containing controversial policy information about chronic wasting disease, a disease effecting deer and elk in numerous U.S. states and Canada. Using the framework as a guide, the paper considers what information agencies should provide given the three different views of government information obligations. The paper then outlines the costs and benefits of fulfilling each view of government information obligations including issues of limited resources, perceived openness and credibility, press coverage, and policy making control.
Type:
Preprint
Language:
en
Keywords:
Social Informatics
Local subject classification:
government information; website evaluation; openness

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEschenfelder, Kristin R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Clark A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-01-11T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:23:40Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-01-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationWhat Public Information Should Government Agencies Publish? A Comparison of Controversial Web-Based Government Information 2006,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105318-
dc.descriptionTo appear in Government Information Quarterly sometime in 2006 or early 2007.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper develops a framework to assess the public information provided on program level government agency Websites. The framework incorporates three views of government information obligations stemming from different assumptions about citizen roles in a democracy: the private citizen view, the attentive citizen view, and the deliberative citizen view. The framework is employed to assess state Websites containing controversial policy information about chronic wasting disease, a disease effecting deer and elk in numerous U.S. states and Canada. Using the framework as a guide, the paper considers what information agencies should provide given the three different views of government information obligations. The paper then outlines the costs and benefits of fulfilling each view of government information obligations including issues of limited resources, perceived openness and credibility, press coverage, and policy making control.en_US
dc.format.mimetypedocen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSocial Informaticsen_US
dc.subject.othergovernment informationen_US
dc.subject.otherwebsite evaluationen_US
dc.subject.otheropennessen_US
dc.titleWhat Public Information Should Government Agencies Publish? A Comparison of Controversial Web-Based Government Informationen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
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