Self-Archiving and the Copyright Transfer Agreements of ISI-Ranked Library and Information Science Journals

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105292
Title:
Self-Archiving and the Copyright Transfer Agreements of ISI-Ranked Library and Information Science Journals
Author:
Coleman, Anita Sundaram
Citation:
Self-Archiving and the Copyright Transfer Agreements of ISI-Ranked Library and Information Science Journals 2006-01,
Issue Date:
Jan-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105292
Submitted date:
2006-01-23
Abstract:
This is a preprint version of a paper submitted to the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. A study of ISI ranked Library and Information Science (LIS) journals (n=52) is reported. The study examined the stances of publishers as expressed in the Copyright Transfer Agreements (CTAs) of the journals towards self-archiving, the practice of depositing digital copies of one's works, preferably in an OAI-compliant open access repository. Results show that 62 % (32) do not make their CTAs available on the open web; 38 % (20) do. Of the 38 % that have CTAs available, two are open access journals. Even among the 20 journal CTAs publicly available a high level of ambiguity exists. Of the 62 % that do not have a public CTA, 40 % are silent about self-archiving. Closer examination augmented by publisher policy documents on copyright, self-archiving, and author instructions, reveals that only five, 10% of the ISI-ranked LIS journals, actually prohibit self-archiving by publisher rule. Copyright transfer agreements are a moving target and publishers appear to be acknowledging that copyright and open access can co-exist in the scholarly journal publishing arena. Given the ambivalence of journal publishers, the communities might be better off by self-archiving in open access archives and strategically building an LIS information commons through a society-led global scholarly communication consortium. The aggregation of OAI-compliant archives and development of disciplinary-specific library services for an LIS commons has the potential to increase the field's research impact and visibility besides ameliorating its own scholarly communication and publishing systems, and serving as a model for others.
Type:
Preprint
Language:
en
Keywords:
Scholarly Communication

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Anita Sundaramen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-01-23T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:23:13Z-
dc.date.issued2006-01en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-01-23en_US
dc.identifier.citationSelf-Archiving and the Copyright Transfer Agreements of ISI-Ranked Library and Information Science Journals 2006-01,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105292-
dc.description.abstractThis is a preprint version of a paper submitted to the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. A study of ISI ranked Library and Information Science (LIS) journals (n=52) is reported. The study examined the stances of publishers as expressed in the Copyright Transfer Agreements (CTAs) of the journals towards self-archiving, the practice of depositing digital copies of one's works, preferably in an OAI-compliant open access repository. Results show that 62 % (32) do not make their CTAs available on the open web; 38 % (20) do. Of the 38 % that have CTAs available, two are open access journals. Even among the 20 journal CTAs publicly available a high level of ambiguity exists. Of the 62 % that do not have a public CTA, 40 % are silent about self-archiving. Closer examination augmented by publisher policy documents on copyright, self-archiving, and author instructions, reveals that only five, 10% of the ISI-ranked LIS journals, actually prohibit self-archiving by publisher rule. Copyright transfer agreements are a moving target and publishers appear to be acknowledging that copyright and open access can co-exist in the scholarly journal publishing arena. Given the ambivalence of journal publishers, the communities might be better off by self-archiving in open access archives and strategically building an LIS information commons through a society-led global scholarly communication consortium. The aggregation of OAI-compliant archives and development of disciplinary-specific library services for an LIS commons has the potential to increase the field's research impact and visibility besides ameliorating its own scholarly communication and publishing systems, and serving as a model for others.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectScholarly Communicationen_US
dc.titleSelf-Archiving and the Copyright Transfer Agreements of ISI-Ranked Library and Information Science Journalsen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
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