Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105135
Title:
Gender and Communication Styles on the World Wide Web
Author:
Sutcliffe, Tami
Citation:
Gender and Communication Styles on the World Wide Web 1998,
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105135
Submitted date:
2005-10-06
Abstract:
Certain human communication traits have historically been identified as gender-specific. The purpose of this paper is to collect and compare the most widely-indexed, gender-specific World Wide Web sites from five given interest areas, and to then determine which, if any, traditionally gender-based communication patterns were present within these sites. Using qualitative and quantitative analysis, this study found that in many cases: * Female-oriented sites in this study emphasized communality * stressed sharing personal experience * resisted authoritative language * encouraged emotional interaction # Male-oriented sites in this study relied on authoritative language # emphasized privacy # stressed professionalism # minimized personal interaction . Although these sites represent only a miniscule "snap shot" of communication on the Web, they seemed to suggest that the core of traditionally identified gender-specific communication traits is being actively transplanted into Cyberspace.
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Keywords:
Communications; Information Seeking Behaviors; Human Computer Interaction
Local subject classification:
gender; communication styles; World Wide Web

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSutcliffe, Tamien_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-10-06T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:20:00Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.date.submitted2005-10-06en_US
dc.identifier.citationGender and Communication Styles on the World Wide Web 1998,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105135-
dc.description.abstractCertain human communication traits have historically been identified as gender-specific. The purpose of this paper is to collect and compare the most widely-indexed, gender-specific World Wide Web sites from five given interest areas, and to then determine which, if any, traditionally gender-based communication patterns were present within these sites. Using qualitative and quantitative analysis, this study found that in many cases: * Female-oriented sites in this study emphasized communality * stressed sharing personal experience * resisted authoritative language * encouraged emotional interaction # Male-oriented sites in this study relied on authoritative language # emphasized privacy # stressed professionalism # minimized personal interaction . Although these sites represent only a miniscule "snap shot" of communication on the Web, they seemed to suggest that the core of traditionally identified gender-specific communication traits is being actively transplanted into Cyberspace.en_US
dc.format.mimetypedocen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectCommunicationsen_US
dc.subjectInformation Seeking Behaviorsen_US
dc.subjectHuman Computer Interactionen_US
dc.subject.othergenderen_US
dc.subject.othercommunication stylesen_US
dc.subject.otherWorld Wide Weben_US
dc.titleGender and Communication Styles on the World Wide Weben_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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