Mathematics for "Just Plain Folks": The Viennese Tradition of Visualization of Quantitative Information and its Verbal Forms, 1899-1914 (graphics accompanying presentation)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105130
Title:
Mathematics for "Just Plain Folks": The Viennese Tradition of Visualization of Quantitative Information and its Verbal Forms, 1899-1914 (graphics accompanying presentation)
Author:
Dalbello, Marija
Citation:
Mathematics for "Just Plain Folks": The Viennese Tradition of Visualization of Quantitative Information and its Verbal Forms, 1899-1914 (graphics accompanying presentation) 2006-10,
Issue Date:
Oct-2006
Description:
Related Work: Dalbello, M. 2002. Franz Josef's Time Machine: Images of Modernity in the Era of Mechanical Photoreproduction. Book History 5: 67-103. Dalbello, M., and A. Spoerri. 2006. Statistical Representations from Popular Texts for the Ordinary Citizen, 1889-1914. Library & Information Science Research 28 (1:2006): 83-109. Podcast of the talk available at: http://www.sir.arizona.edu/resources/podcasts/dalbello_20061011.mp3
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105130
Submitted date:
2006-11-02
Abstract:
This handout accompanies a podcast of invited presentation given at the University of Arizona, School of Information Resources and Library Service Brown Bag History & Philosophy of Information Research Series (Tucson, AZ, October 11, 2006). The talk focused on visual statistics from the turn of the nineteenth and the twentieth century. These popular forms of quantitative argumentation are examined from the point of view of the involvement of print industry in the shaping of and dissemination of public policy and the discourse of rational management and the modern state in the Habsburg empire on the eve of its dissolution. EXTENDED ABSTRACT: Statistical representations in the popular almanacs published at the end of the nineteenth century in the Habsburg Empire are an early prototype of visualizing statistical data for popular consumption and informing the public of an ethnically and linguistically differentiated society. These naturalistic and culturally rich visualizations enabled ordinary citizens to acquire knowledge â using simple visual reasoning skills, reliance on mental models and narrative conventions. The visualization of statistics is accompanied by verbalization, which presents a parallel mode of quantitative reasoning. These verbalizations exemplify the language of practical mathematics: the problem is generated in relation to the setting and located in everyday activities of the lived-in world of the implied viewers. The presentation will focus on these verbalizations of visual statistics, combining cognitive approach with historical and cultural interpretation to examine how rhetorical forms attached to practical mathematical reasoning can be related to cognition as socially situated activity. The connection of verbalizations to visual sense-making in these early statistical representations for popular consumption exemplify the construction of the concept of â informationâ in modernity and explore the effects on the visual regime represented by statistical information of older verbal forms of quantitative reasoning.
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Keywords:
History
Local subject classification:
information graphics; information visualization; print culture; text / image; orality / literacy; quantitative explanations; popular mathematics; history of information regimes in modernity; visual epistemologies; isotypes; visual culture of the Habsburg Empire, 1880-1930; popular print - almanacs; knowledge structures and documentary practices

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDalbello, Marijaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-02T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:19:55Z-
dc.date.issued2006-10en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-11-02en_US
dc.identifier.citationMathematics for "Just Plain Folks": The Viennese Tradition of Visualization of Quantitative Information and its Verbal Forms, 1899-1914 (graphics accompanying presentation) 2006-10,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105130-
dc.descriptionRelated Work: Dalbello, M. 2002. Franz Josef's Time Machine: Images of Modernity in the Era of Mechanical Photoreproduction. Book History 5: 67-103. Dalbello, M., and A. Spoerri. 2006. Statistical Representations from Popular Texts for the Ordinary Citizen, 1889-1914. Library & Information Science Research 28 (1:2006): 83-109. Podcast of the talk available at: http://www.sir.arizona.edu/resources/podcasts/dalbello_20061011.mp3en_US
dc.description.abstractThis handout accompanies a podcast of invited presentation given at the University of Arizona, School of Information Resources and Library Service Brown Bag History & Philosophy of Information Research Series (Tucson, AZ, October 11, 2006). The talk focused on visual statistics from the turn of the nineteenth and the twentieth century. These popular forms of quantitative argumentation are examined from the point of view of the involvement of print industry in the shaping of and dissemination of public policy and the discourse of rational management and the modern state in the Habsburg empire on the eve of its dissolution. EXTENDED ABSTRACT: Statistical representations in the popular almanacs published at the end of the nineteenth century in the Habsburg Empire are an early prototype of visualizing statistical data for popular consumption and informing the public of an ethnically and linguistically differentiated society. These naturalistic and culturally rich visualizations enabled ordinary citizens to acquire knowledge â using simple visual reasoning skills, reliance on mental models and narrative conventions. The visualization of statistics is accompanied by verbalization, which presents a parallel mode of quantitative reasoning. These verbalizations exemplify the language of practical mathematics: the problem is generated in relation to the setting and located in everyday activities of the lived-in world of the implied viewers. The presentation will focus on these verbalizations of visual statistics, combining cognitive approach with historical and cultural interpretation to examine how rhetorical forms attached to practical mathematical reasoning can be related to cognition as socially situated activity. The connection of verbalizations to visual sense-making in these early statistical representations for popular consumption exemplify the construction of the concept of â informationâ in modernity and explore the effects on the visual regime represented by statistical information of older verbal forms of quantitative reasoning.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subject.otherinformation graphicsen_US
dc.subject.otherinformation visualizationen_US
dc.subject.otherprint cultureen_US
dc.subject.othertext / imageen_US
dc.subject.otherorality / literacyen_US
dc.subject.otherquantitative explanationsen_US
dc.subject.otherpopular mathematicsen_US
dc.subject.otherhistory of information regimes in modernityen_US
dc.subject.othervisual epistemologiesen_US
dc.subject.otherisotypesen_US
dc.subject.othervisual culture of the Habsburg Empire, 1880-1930en_US
dc.subject.otherpopular print - almanacsen_US
dc.subject.otherknowledge structures and documentary practicesen_US
dc.titleMathematics for "Just Plain Folks": The Viennese Tradition of Visualization of Quantitative Information and its Verbal Forms, 1899-1914 (graphics accompanying presentation)en_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
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