Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105049
Title:
Public Performances and Private Acts
Author:
Coleman, Anita Sundaram
Citation:
Public Performances and Private Acts 1996, 37(4):325-342 Journal of Education for Library and Information Science
Publisher:
Association for Library and Information Science Education
Journal:
Journal of Education for Library and Information Science
Issue Date:
1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/105049
Submitted date:
2005-01-10
Abstract:
Distance learning using telecommunications technologies holds new and challenging promises for library and information science (LIS) education. Pedagogical, technological, cultural/sociopolitical issues and their impact upon the constituents involved--faculty, accrediting bodies, students, employers and educational administration--need to be systematically studied. Findings of a research project that examined one of the human agencies involved in distance learning, full-time faculty at library schools who have taught LIS courses for graduate credit to distance learners using a telecommunications technology, are reported. The primary research questions were exploratory ones that sought answers about the impact of the distance-learning educational model upon faculty. The methodology used was a mix of written survey, telephone, and direct interview techniques. Faculty perceived that their role changed in the distance-learning model from what it was in the traditional classroom-based model. "Teaching is no longer a private act; it is a public performance." Other findings are that more time is required for class preparation; patterns of interaction and communication between students and faculty are different; technical and managerial skills are needed; sociopolitical issues (such as copyright) need to be addressed; and specific knowledge about learning behaviors within this model is needed. Teaching, in this model, is a complex performance that may conflict with the prevailing organizational culture of both the institution and the academic profession. However, the "critical mass" of a library school teaching faculty (conspicuous for its small size) requires several changes if distance learning is to be pursued successfully, and these are discussed briefly. Salient, early historical points about the Board of Education for Librarianship (BEL, American Library Association), American Association of Library Schools (AALS), forerunner to the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE), and the Gaylord Brothers (New York) financed American Correspondence School of Librarianship (ACSL) are included.
Type:
Journal Article (Paginated)
Language:
en
Keywords:
Distributed Learning; Library and Information Science Education
Local subject classification:
distance education; telecommunications technologies; surveys; interviews

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Anita Sundaramen_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-01-10T00:00:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:18:39Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.date.submitted2005-01-10en_US
dc.identifier.citationPublic Performances and Private Acts 1996, 37(4):325-342 Journal of Education for Library and Information Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105049-
dc.description.abstractDistance learning using telecommunications technologies holds new and challenging promises for library and information science (LIS) education. Pedagogical, technological, cultural/sociopolitical issues and their impact upon the constituents involved--faculty, accrediting bodies, students, employers and educational administration--need to be systematically studied. Findings of a research project that examined one of the human agencies involved in distance learning, full-time faculty at library schools who have taught LIS courses for graduate credit to distance learners using a telecommunications technology, are reported. The primary research questions were exploratory ones that sought answers about the impact of the distance-learning educational model upon faculty. The methodology used was a mix of written survey, telephone, and direct interview techniques. Faculty perceived that their role changed in the distance-learning model from what it was in the traditional classroom-based model. "Teaching is no longer a private act; it is a public performance." Other findings are that more time is required for class preparation; patterns of interaction and communication between students and faculty are different; technical and managerial skills are needed; sociopolitical issues (such as copyright) need to be addressed; and specific knowledge about learning behaviors within this model is needed. Teaching, in this model, is a complex performance that may conflict with the prevailing organizational culture of both the institution and the academic profession. However, the "critical mass" of a library school teaching faculty (conspicuous for its small size) requires several changes if distance learning is to be pursued successfully, and these are discussed briefly. Salient, early historical points about the Board of Education for Librarianship (BEL, American Library Association), American Association of Library Schools (AALS), forerunner to the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE), and the Gaylord Brothers (New York) financed American Correspondence School of Librarianship (ACSL) are included.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Library and Information Science Educationen_US
dc.subjectDistributed Learningen_US
dc.subjectLibrary and Information Science Educationen_US
dc.subject.otherdistance educationen_US
dc.subject.othertelecommunications technologiesen_US
dc.subject.othersurveysen_US
dc.subject.otherinterviewsen_US
dc.titlePublic Performances and Private Actsen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Education for Library and Information Scienceen_US
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